Herbs Spices Seasonings

Cinnamon Powder

Origin: Vietnam, Indonesia

Cinnamomum burmannii

Cinnamon (Cassia) is widely cultivated in tropical or subtropical areas throughout Asia. Once harvested, the bark, curls up into ‘quills’ when left to dry, and the wood, which is not aromatic, is discarded or used as fuel. The common name, ‘cassia’, is believed to be derived from the Greek word kassia, meaning to strip off the bark. Its scent is uniquely warming, uplifting, and stimulating, and its flavor sweet and delicious.

Throughout history, Cinnamon has been traded and used in many applications. It was treasured as a culinary spice, utilizing it in perfumes and medicines and is believed to support the respiratory, nervous, circulatory, urinary, and reproductive systems. It's also commonly known for it's potential aid in the digestive process. Many cultures have used Cinnamon in their health practices topically and internally for thousands of years making Cinnamon one of the most commonly known spices with applications in multiple areas of food and health.

Cinnamon can be used in oatmeal, cereal, baked goods and smoothies to extracts, teas, flavorings, and capsules. It's appealing flavor makes this a staple in almost every spice cabinet, and offers many amazing benefits.